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A LARGE CARVED OAK GOLDEN EAGLE BY GERRARD ROBINSON

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A LARGE CARVED OAK GOLDEN EAGLE BY GERRARD ROBINSON

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England, circa 1866

Robinson became an apprentice 'carver and gilder' at the age of 14 at the firm of Thomas H. Tweedy of Grainger Street, Newcastle and remained with them until 1862. He was heavily involved in the carving of some of the firms four highly ornamental pieces for the 1862 Exhibition; a figure of Robinson Crusoe, a Tam O'Shanter panel and two large sideboards (one called 'The Robinson Crusoe Sideboard' and the other heavily carved with scenes from the plays of William Shakespeare). 

Later in 1862 Robinson set-up business on his own in Newcastle. Between 1862 and 1863 he carved what is regarded as his masterpiece 'The Chevy Chase Sideboard' which he was unable to sell at the exhibition at Newcastle's Central Exchange in August of 1863. He moved to London at the end of this year (taking the sideboard with him) and spent three years in the capital, during which time taught wood-carving to, amongst others, the Earl of Caithness. 

During his time in London he carved smaller items including eagle lectern's for churches including St. James's in Piccadilly.   Here his work was to sit alongside a masterpiece by Grinling Gibbons and it is highly likely he carved the pulpit. In 1866 he returned to Newcastle and during the late 1860s and early 1870s he entered his most productive period carving a huge chimney-piece and four large chairs for Lord Manver at Thoresby, Nottingham and a sideboard for Sir George Chetwynd at Grendon Hall amongst others. In June 1873 Robinson held an auction of around 70 lots of his own stock including 'Ivanhoe' and 'Robin Hood' sideboards. Through the remainder of 1870s and 1880s business continued (along with his teaching classes in wood carving) but commissions declined and he only worked on three more major pieces – in 1887 he carved panels showing scenes from the life of Queen Victoria for a 'Jubilee' sideboard made by a local cabinet-maker George Bennett. In 1888 he carved a huge 'Burns' sideboard which was exhibited in Newcastle, Edinburgh and York. Robinson had one last major piece which was a second version of 'The Chevy Chase Sideboard' made as a retirement gift for Joseph Snowball, the Duke of Northumberland's steward. Robinson died from pneumonia on 16th March 1891.

Two works by Robinson are in the Victoria & Albert Museum.  

By Gerrard Robinson (1834 - 1891).

Signed & dated - London, 1866.

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England, circa 1866

Robinson became an apprentice 'carver and gilder' at the age of 14 at the firm of Thomas H. Tweedy of Grainger Street, Newcastle and remained with them until 1862. He was heavily involved in the carving of some of the firms four highly ornamental pieces for the 1862 Exhibition; a figure of Robinson Crusoe, a Tam O'Shanter panel and two large sideboards (one called 'The Robinson Crusoe Sideboard' and the other heavily carved with scenes from the plays of William Shakespeare). 

Later in 1862 Robinson set-up business on his own in Newcastle. Between 1862 and 1863 he carved what is regarded as his masterpiece 'The Chevy Chase Sideboard' which he was unable to sell at the exhibition at Newcastle's Central Exchange in August of 1863. He moved to London at the end of this year (taking the sideboard with him) and spent three years in the capital, during which time taught wood-carving to, amongst others, the Earl of Caithness. 

During his time in London he carved smaller items including eagle lectern's for churches including St. James's in Piccadilly.   Here his work was to sit alongside a masterpiece by Grinling Gibbons and it is highly likely he carved the pulpit. In 1866 he returned to Newcastle and during the late 1860s and early 1870s he entered his most productive period carving a huge chimney-piece and four large chairs for Lord Manver at Thoresby, Nottingham and a sideboard for Sir George Chetwynd at Grendon Hall amongst others. In June 1873 Robinson held an auction of around 70 lots of his own stock including 'Ivanhoe' and 'Robin Hood' sideboards. Through the remainder of 1870s and 1880s business continued (along with his teaching classes in wood carving) but commissions declined and he only worked on three more major pieces – in 1887 he carved panels showing scenes from the life of Queen Victoria for a 'Jubilee' sideboard made by a local cabinet-maker George Bennett. In 1888 he carved a huge 'Burns' sideboard which was exhibited in Newcastle, Edinburgh and York. Robinson had one last major piece which was a second version of 'The Chevy Chase Sideboard' made as a retirement gift for Joseph Snowball, the Duke of Northumberland's steward. Robinson died from pneumonia on 16th March 1891.

Two works by Robinson are in the Victoria & Albert Museum.  

By Gerrard Robinson (1834 - 1891).

Signed & dated - London, 1866.